WEAPON SUPPLIES FUELLING TERRORISM IN THE LAKE CHAD CRISIS

In 2019 CAR investigators travelled to the Diffa region of south-eastern Niger to document weapons and ammunition seized from terrorist groups operating in the areas around Lake Chad. In this Dispatch from the Field, CAR provides a first systematic assessment of the origins and supply sources of some of the illicit weaponry deployed by militants affiliated with Jama’atu Ahlis Sunnah Lidda’awati wal-Jihad (the Sunni Muslim Group for Preaching and Jihad, or JAS)—more commonly referred to as Boko Haram—and the emergent Islamic State West Africa Province (ISWAP).

ILLICIT WEAPONS IN AFGHANISTAN – ISSUE 02

Since the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan in mid-August 2021, concerns have grown over the changing terrorist landscape in the country and the threat posed by groups such as the Islamic State Khorasan Province (ISKP). This second Frontline Perspective focuses on weapons used in two high-profile attacks in Kabul: the May 2019 Taliban-claimed attack on Counterpart International, and the November 2020 ISKP-claimed attack on Kabul University. It helps shine a spotlight on tactics and weapon selection for such high-profile attacks, and highlights important similarities between the weapons used.

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WEAPONS OF THE WAR IN UKRAINE

Since 2018, CAR field investigation teams have carried out forensic documentation of the military equipment that has been recovered from armed formations of the self-declared Donetsk and Luhansk 'People's Republics' (DPR and LPR) in eastern Ukraine.

This report is the result of a three-year study into the supply sources of weapons, ammunition, vehicles, armour, and artillery used in the conflict.

Explore dynamic case studies and interact with the data from these investigations in CAR's Ukraine iTrace Resource Centre

ILLICIT WEAPONS IN AFGHANISTAN – ISSUE 01

Recent Taliban seizures of equipment previously provided to Afghan National Defence and Security Forces (ANDSF) by the United States and NATO probably constitutes one of the most significant large-scale diversion of military equipment in recent history. This Frontline Perspective, the first in a series from CAR's investigations in Afghanistan, explores the long-standing capacity of the Taliban and other armed actors in Afghanistan to access weapons that had been issued to ANDSF, and considers the systemic challenges that have enabled weapon diversion from national custody.

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IRANIAN AM-50 12.7 × 99 MM ANTI-MATERIEL RIFLE

For this Technical Report, a CAR field investigation team disassembled a recovered AM-50 anti-materiel rifle and comprehensively documented its component parts. This report provides a technical analysis of each of these components, highlighting key identifying features and yielding new insight into Iran’s weapon manufacturing practices.

IDENTIFYING MATERIEL MANUFACTURED IN THE DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF KOREA (DPRK)

A guide to identifying weapons and ammunition produced by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) using examples of materiel documented by CAR in the field. This field guide provides diagrams showing distinguishing features of AK-pattern small arms, small-calibre ammunition (7.62 mm to 14.5 mm), and medium to large calibre ammunition (40 mm rockets and 130 mm artillery ammunition). Diagrams also show distinguishing features of packaging, including false descriptions of package contents.

DEVELOPING RFID SOLUTIONS IN SUPPORT OF STOCKPILE MANAGEMENT AND POST-DIVERSION TRACING

As part of the European Union-funded ‘Field Forensic Firearms Exploitation’ (F3E) project, CAR and implementing partner TTE-Europe GmbH are developing innovative solutions to enhance the capability of states to manage and trace SALW, using radio frequency identification (RFID) transponders. This report discusses the research and development activities conducted during 2020.

THE IED THREAT IN BAHRAIN

This report shows that external supply chains have provided components for the construction of IEDS to Bahraini militants. This materiel is identical to materiel captured from Houthi forces in Yemen and demonstrates Bahraini militants’ capability to manufacture explosives and IEDs domestically.

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